Health Justice CT

Health Justice CT Blog

Health Disparities Round-Up – March 21, 2014

U.S MapJust in case you missed it, here’s some of the latest health disparities news, posts and reports from this past week.

Redding: How states are tackling ‘health disparities’ – “African-Americans are more likely to suffer heart disease and diabetes than whites. The cancer death rate for men is a good deal higher than it is for women. American Indians and Alaska Natives are more likely to smoke tobacco than Hispanics, blacks or whites. And Native Hawaiian adults are less likely to exercise than other ethnic groups. These differences are called “health disparities,” and in the past two decades, the federal government and the states have focused on eliminating them.”  >> Read More

HealthCanal: Joint cancer center study finds barriers to minority clinical trial participation – “A new study involving researchers from UC Davis and four other National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers reveals important barriers that limit minority group participation in cancer clinical trials, findings that will be used to refine and launch more effective strategies to assure that more minorities benefit from clinical trials. The study, published online today in Cancer, found variations in how the cancer centers gather patient demographic information and other relevant data. The research was part of a national effort to recruit more racial/ethnic minorities into therapeutic clinical trials and, ultimately, to reduce the disproportional incidence of many cancers among those populations.” >> Read More

Health Affairs Blog: Why Are Hispanics Slow To Enroll In ACA Coverage? Insights From The Health Reform Monitoring Survey – “As the end of the ACA’s first open enrollment period approaches, there is a big push to get as many uninsured people signed up for coverage as possible. As of March 1, 2014, more than 4.2 million people had enrolled in a plan through a federal or state health insurance Marketplace, with 2.1 million having enrolled since January 1 alone. An additional 2.4 to 3.5 million people have enrolled in Medicaid through January 2014 as a result of the ACA. However, recent  media reports indicate that one group with historically high rates of uninsurance—Hispanics—have been slow to sign up for coverage so far, particularly in California.” >> Read More

Medical X Press: Hypertension going untreated in US Hispanic community – “There is a significant deficit in recognition and control of hypertension in the Hispanic population of the United States, according to a new study published in American Journal of Hypertension (AJH). The study, “Prevalence of hypertension, awareness, treatment and control in the Hispanic Community,” led by Dr. Paul D. Sorlie of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), sampled 16,400 individuals, making it one of the largest and most rigorous health studies of the Hispanic community. Hispanics are currently the largest minority group within the US population. The results show that while the prevalence of hypertension in the Hispanic community is nearly equal to that of non-Hispanic whites, diagnosis of the disease is much lower, as is general awareness of its symptoms and treatment options.” >> Read More

Connecticut Health I-Team: Dangers Of Overtreatment Focus Of March 18 Foundation Forum – “Why does the U.S. health care system rank in the bottom third of developed nations, even though we spend twice as much as any other country? According to Shannon Brownlee, senior vice president of the Lown Institute and author of the book, “Overtreated: Why Too Much Medicine Is Making Us Sicker and Poorer,” the crux of the problem lies within the doctor-patient relationship.” >> Read More

New York TimesIncome Gap, Meet the Longevity Gap – “That reality is playing out across the country. For the upper half of the income spectrum, men who reach the age of 65 are living about six years longer than they did in the late 1970s. Men in the lower half are living just 1.3 years longer. This life-expectancy gap has started to surface in discussions among researchers, public health officials and Washington policy makers. The general trend is for Americans to live longer, and as lawmakers contemplate changes to government programs — like nudging up the Social Security retirement age or changing its cost-of-living adjustment — they are confronted with the potential unfairness to those who die considerably earlier.” >> Read More

NationalJournal: Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health—and How to Fix Them – “The goal that Lorraine Speaks has set for herself seems simple: Eat better. Barely 5 feet tall, the 58-year-old weighs 240 pounds. To lose weight, she knows she’ll have to cut back on processed foods and the bags of miniature cookies that are her go-to snack. Three weeks into a weight-loss program at the 11th Street Family Health Services here in North Philadelphia, instructor John Kirby helps Speaks focus. He suggests she aim for three servings of fruits and vegetables daily. It’s a good goal, Speaks says, but do canned vegetables count? In the transitional housing facility where she lives, the kitchen is shared and fridge space is limited, so keeping fresh vegetables is difficult.” >> Read More

USA Today: Disturbing differences: Health disparities tackled by states – “African-Americans are more likely to suffer heart disease and diabetes than whites. The cancer death rate for men is a good deal higher than it is for women. American Indians and Alaska Natives are more likely to smoke tobacco than Hispanics, blacks or whites. And Native Hawaiian adults are less likely to exercise than other ethnic groups. These differences are called “health disparities,” and in the last two decades, the federal government and the states have focused on eliminating them.” >> Read More

About Gina Hernandez

Gina Hernandez is a Program Director at the Society for New Communications Research and has worked 7+ years in the digital communications field. Prior to joining the Society for New Communications Research, Gina worked at re: Imagine group, where she where she led media and blogger outreach and agency research.

This entry was posted in Health News Round-Up and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.