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Health Disparities Round-Up – November 7, 2014

Just in case you missed it, here’s some of the latest health disparities news, posts and reports from this past week.

Connecticut Health I-Team: Diligence Pays Off When Shopping For Health Insurance – “Connecticut consumers who carefully consider their health status and financial needs stand to reap the greatest benefits when shopping for insurance during the 2015 open enrollment period. The enrollment period to purchase coverage at Access Health CT (AHCT), the online marketplace created by the Affordable Care Act, runs from Nov. 15, 2014, to Feb. 15, 2015. The law requires most Americans to carry health insurance or pay a fine when they file their federal income taxes.” >> Read More

New Haven Register: What Connecticut consumers need to know when purchasing coverage at Access Health CT – “Connecticut consumers who carefully consider their health status and financial needs stand to reap the greatest benefits when shopping for insurance during the 2015 open enrollment period. The enrollment period to purchase coverage at Access Health CT (AHCT), the online marketplace created by the Affordable Care Act, runs from Nov. 15, 2014 to Feb. 15, 2015. The law requires most Americans to carry health insurance or pay a fine when they file their federal income taxes. During this time, current enrollees can make changes to their plan or select a new plan. Individuals without health insurance can also shop for coverage during this period. People can sign up for Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) through AHCT, too.” >> Read More

The Upshot: Who Would Have Health Insurance if Medicaid Expansion Weren’t Optional – “In 2012, the Supreme Court ruled that a cornerstone of the Affordable Care Act — its expansion of Medicaid to low-income people around the country — must be optional for states. But what if it had ruled differently? More than three million people, many of them across the South, would now have health insurance through Medicaid, according to an Upshot analysis of data from Enroll America and Civis Analytics. The uninsured rate would be two percentage points lower.” >> Read More

The CT Mirror: 30,000 could lose coverage or subsidies as exchange addresses income, immigration discrepancies – “As many as 30,000 customers of the state’s health insurance exchange could lose their coverage or see a drop in the subsidies used to discount their premiums next month because they did not submit information needed to verify their eligibility, acting exchange CEO Jim Wadleigh said. Those changes, which will take effect Dec. 1, could affect more than 10 percent of the Connecticut residents who signed up for private insurance or Medicaid through the exchange, Access Health CT. They’re the result of the exchange’s implementing a process to adjust or cut off coverage of people who failed to address discrepancies related to the income or citizenship information they provided when applying for coverage.” >> Read More

The Upshot: Election Will Leave Medicaid Policies Largely Unchanged – “The health law sought to expand Medicaid to every resident earning below an income threshold of about $16,000. But a 2012 Supreme Court decision made the expansion optional. (To get a sense of what the Affordable Care Act might have meant without that ruling — or just to get a sense of what expansion might mean to these states — see our article on what the Medicaid expansion might have looked like.) So far, 27 states and the District of Columbia have decided to expand their programs. The remaining states, all but three led by Republican governors, have decided against expansion.” >> Read More

ThinkProgress: Obesity Is About To Surpass Tobacco As The Leading Cause Of Cancer – “Where you live in the United States shouldn’t determine how long and how healthy you live — but it does, far more than it should,” CDC Director Tom Frieden said in July when the federal agency released a study that showed lower life expectancy among people burdened with disproportionate crime, poverty, limited health care, and poor schools. Frieden used the study as an opportunity to discuss glaring socioeconomic inequalities that will undermine efforts to increase eat healthy and exercise among all Americans. Frieden added: “Not only do people in certain states and African-Americans live shorter lives, they also live a greater proportion of their last years in poor health. It will be important moving forward to support prevention programs that make it easier for people to be healthy no matter where they live.” >> Read More

Huffington Post: Black Infant Deaths Point to Flaw in U.S. Health Care System – “According to the National Centers of Health Statistics, the disproportionately high rate of black infant deaths contributes substantially to the poor ranking of the United States. Black infants born in the United States are more than twice as likely to die before reaching the age of 1 than infants in other racial and ethnic groups. While the overall rate has fallen dramatically over the past five decades, there is a pervasive and persistent difference between the rates of blacks and whites. According to the NCHS, in 2010 the infant-mortality rate for blacks (11.46 percent) was nearly the same as whites (5.18 percent) in the 1980s, a near 30-year lag.” >> Read More

Image Credit: iStock Photo

 

About Gina Hernandez

Gina Hernandez is a Program Director at the Society for New Communications Research and has worked 7+ years in the digital communications field. Prior to joining the Society for New Communications Research, Gina worked at re: Imagine group, where she where she led media and blogger outreach and agency research.

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