Health Justice CT

Health Justice CT Blog

Health Disparities Round-Up – September 26, 2014

Just in case you missed it, here’s some of the latest health disparities news, posts and reports from this past week

Marketplace: Health care coverage reaches Latinos – “The percentage of Latinos who lack health insurance has fallen by more than a third since the Affordable Care Act kicked in this year, according to a new report from The Commonwealth Fund, a health care policy group. Historically, Latinos have been one of the least-covered groups in the U.S. when it comes to health insurance. Michelle Doty, the lead author of the report, says the low coverage has a lot to do with employment trends.” >> Read More

LA Times: White House reassessing Obamacare enrollment goal for 2015 – “The Obama administration, which is scrambling to prepare a new push to enroll Americans in health coverage under the federal health law, is reassessing how many more people will sign up, Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell said Wednesday. About 7.3 million people are enrolled in health plans being sold through marketplaces created this year by the Affordable Care Act, according to federal figures.” >> Read More

Capsules (The Kaiser Health Blog): Report: Difficulties Likely To Persist In Enrolling Asian-Americans, Pacific Islanders – “Language and cultural issues, along with immigration concerns, could still pose major barriers to enrolling Asian-Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders in health insurance plans this fall, according to a report released Wednesday by Action for Health Justice, an advocacy coalition that aims to educate these populations about the health law. The report argues that efforts to enroll people from those ethnic groups were undermined last year by ineffective translations of health law guides; limited language options on the federal online marketplace, healthcare.gov; insufficient training for enrollment assisters and complications in processing applicants’ immigration information. If those issues are not addressed by this year’s open enrollment – which begins Nov. 15 – they will likely continue to be a roadblock to expanding coverage, according to the report.” >> Read More

Families USA: Medicaid Expansion and Health Disparities: African Americans – “In the states that have chosen not to expand their Medicaid program, there are hundreds of thousands of uninsured, low-income African Americans who are lagging behind on key measures of access to health care. Whether individuals are insured or uninsured greatly affects their ability to obtain regular health care. And in communities of color, where rates of uninsurance and poor health outcomes are higher than in white communities, the differences between those who have insurance and those who lack it are stark. To explore how expanding Medicaid can mitigate these disparities in health care, we compared how insured and uninsured low-income African Americans in four states fare in terms of access to health care and preventive health services.” >> Read More

CTPost.com: Racial health divide in utero – “In Connecticut, a pregnant woman of color is more likely to lose her infant at birth than is a pregnant white woman. A woman of color is less likely to receive adequate prenatal care in Connecticut, and — if she carries to term — more likely to give birth to a low-weight baby, according to a March report from the state Department of Public Health. The state’s racial divide reaches all the way into the womb.” >> Read More

The New York Times: Medicaid Gives the Poor a Reason to Say No Thanks – “There are generally two ways that people with insurance pay for health care in the United States: premiums, which get you insurance before you receive care, and a variety of cost-sharing mechanisms — like deductibles, co-pays and coinsurance — that come into play when you do receive it. While Medicaid, our safety net program for the poor, has used cost-sharing mechanisms for some time, it has been prohibited from asking people to pay premiums. In the last couple of years, federal regulators have started lifting that prohibition, which is likely to lead to some negative consequences.” >> Read More

The CT Mirror: Why some Obamacare insurance discounts could drop in 2015 – “Costs to buy coverage through Connecticut’s health insurance exchange won’t, on average, rise much next year. For some plans, the prices are dropping. But some customers who get financial aid to buy their insurance could see price increases beyond the rise in sticker price if they stick with their current plans, according to an analysis by consultants for the exchange, Access Health CT. As a result, some people might find lower prices by considering different plans, even if they bought the cheapest plan available this year, according to the analysis by Wakely Consulting Group.” >> Read More

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About Gina Hernandez

Gina Hernandez is a Program Director at the Society for New Communications Research and has worked 7+ years in the digital communications field. Prior to joining the Society for New Communications Research, Gina worked at re: Imagine group, where she where she led media and blogger outreach and agency research.

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