Health Justice CT

Health Justice CT Blog

Health Disparities Roundup – Friday, October 19, 2012

Image Credit: istockphoto by JimmyAnderson

Here’s some of the latest health disparities news, posts and reports from this past week.

Voxxi: Vitamin D deficiency common in Hispanics, linked to chronic disease – “According to Mangoo-Karim’s research, however, which indicated 90 percent of Hispanics in the study were vitamin D deficient compared to 50 percent of non-Hispanic whites, low levels of vitamin D were likely linked to genetics rather than skin pigmentation.” – Read More

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation New Public Health: APHA on Active Transportation: Recommended Reading – “The American Public Health Association and the Safe Routes to School National Partnership have joined together to create an active transportation primer, Promoting Active Transportation: An Opportunity for Public Health. The goal of the primer is to provide public health practitioners with critical background information on the value of active transportation, such as walking, bike riding, jogging and running to help reduce obesity, transportation expenses and the environmental impact of cars and buses in communities. The primer authors say educating public health leaders about active transportation can affect how transportation is built in communities, regions and states, and engage stakeholders to find effective calls for action.” >> Read More

Huffington Post: Like Your Neighborhood? What It Means For Your Physical Health – “Are you a fan of your neighborhood? The answer could say a lot about your health, according to a new report. – “Are you a fan of your neighborhood? The answer could say a lot about your health, according to a new report. Gallup researchers found that people who like their community, or who think that their community is improving, report better physical health than people who don’t like their community or think that their community is deteriorating in terms of livability. Gallup researchers found that people who like their community, or who think that their community is improving, report better physical health than people who don’t like their community or think that their community is deteriorating in terms of livability.” >> Read More

the ct mirror: Prescriptions for produce helping to cut obesity – “FVRX is now in its second year of pilot programs in more than a half-dozen states, including its first year in Connecticut. The program links patients — obese or overweight children and/or pregnant women — with community health services like Fair Haven and farmers’ markets like the five run by CitySeed in New Haven. Its premise is that combating obesity among the poor requires not only education on what to eat, how to eat it and other aspects of good health such as exercise, but also the money so they can afford the often pricier fruits and vegetables the doctors are prescribing.” >> Read More

Hartford Courant: School Cafeterias: More Fruit, Less Mystery Meat – “School dietitians are getting creative in the kitchen to meet federal health rules, but some Connecticut students are trashing the new menus — literally.” >> Read More

HealthDay: Sleepless Nights Might Raise Odds for Diabetes – “Poor sleep may not only leave you drowsy, it might also raise your odds for a precursor condition to diabetes, according to a small new study that looks at how fat cells respond to sleepless nights.” >> Read More

Huffington Post: A Call to Action to Bring LGBT Health Disparities out of the Closet – “Twenty-five years ago, the AIDS Memorial Quilt was displayed for the first time in Washington, D.C., and hundreds of thousands of people participated in a march for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) rights. The U.S. can celebrate progress on a few measures of social justice for the LGBT community — yet the nation has barely begun to address the silent crisis of health disparities in LGBT populations.” >> Read More

Blog.AIDS.gov: National Latino HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NLAAD) – Monday (October 15) – “The factors that put Latinos at higher risk for HIV are complex. Lack of access to health care is a serious issue for Latinos living with HIV/AIDS. Health insurance greatly improves access—but, according to the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study (HCSUS), 24% of Latinos with HIV/AIDS were uninsured, compared with 17% of whites. Of those with private insurance, Latinos were about half as likely to be privately insured compared to their white counterparts (23% vs. 44%).  The diversity of the Latino community requires a diverse approach toward HIV prevention, testing, and treatment initiatives that focuses on specific cultural factors in local communities.” >> Read More

About Gina Hernandez

Gina Hernandez is a Program Director at the Society for New Communications Research and has worked 7+ years in the digital communications field. Prior to joining the Society for New Communications Research, Gina worked at re: Imagine group, where she where she led media and blogger outreach and agency research.

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